SNC-Meteorites: Finds, which are identified as stones from the Mars
Norbert Brügge, Germany

last update: 21.11.2013

The SNC - meteorites are a group of meteorites, by them is assumed, that they originate from the Mars. They own an in comparison with other meteorite low old (about a billion years) and must originate thus from a celestial object, which had still a relatively young geological activity. Besides they contain included gases, which correspond to in their composition of the Mars - atmosphere, as they are determined also through measurements of the Viking - probes.

SNC-Meteorites are often made of small mineral grains that can't be seen clearly without a microscope. To see these small grains, scientists grind and polish rock samples very thin (0.03 millimeters) so light can pass through them. This picture is a microscopic view, about 2.3 millimeters across, of a martian meteorite. The brown areas are grains of the mineral pyroxene and the clear white areas are the mineral plagioclase. These are the two most abundant minerals in basalt, both on Earth and Mars. The black areas are magnetite, an iron-oxide mineral.

The following meteorites are identified as stones from the Mars:
(compare  http://www.meteoris.de/mars/list.html )

  Name Location

Date

Type

1

Chassigny

France, Haute-Marne province, village of Chassigny

1815

dunite (chassignite)

2

Shergotty

India, Bihar State, town Shergahti

1865

basaltic shergottite

3

Zagami

Nigeria, Katsina Province, Zagami Rock

1962

basaltic shergottite

4

Los Angeles 001

United States, California, Los Angeles County
(probably Mojave Desert)

1999

basaltic shergottite

Los Angeles 002

1999

basaltic shergottite

5

Lafayette

United States, Indiana, Lafayette

1931

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

6

Governador Valadares

Brazil, state Minas Gerais, city Governador Valadares

1958

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

7

Nakhla

Egypt, El-Nakhla village, Gov. Alexandria

1911

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

   

 Saudi Arabia

 

 

8

Sayh al Uhaymir 005

Oman, Sayh al Uhaymir

1999

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir 008

1999

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir 051

2000

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir 060

2001

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir 090

2002

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir 094

2001

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir 120

2002

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir 125

2003

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir 130

2004

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir 150

2002

olivine-phyric shergottite

Sayh al Uhaymir xxxx

2003

olivine-phyric shergottite

9

Dhofar 019

Oman, Dhofar

2000

olivine-phyric shergottite

10

Dhofar 378

2000

basaltic shergottite

Dhofar xxxx

2001

basaltic shergottite

11

Jiddat al Harasis 479

Oman

2008

basaltic shergottite

   

 Antartica

 

 

12

ALH A77005

Antarctica, Victoria Land, Allan Hills

1977

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

13

EET A79001

Antarctica, Victoria Land, Elephant Moraine

1980

basaltic shergottite + olivine-phyric shergottite

14

ALH 84001

Antarctica, Victoria Land, Allan Hills

1984

orthopyroxenite (wehrlite shergottite)

15

LEW 88516

Antarctica, Victoria Land, Lewis Cliff

1988

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

16

QUE 94201

Antarctica, Victoria Land, Queen Alexandra Range

1994

basaltic shergottite

17

Yamato 000027

Antarctica, Victoria Land, Yamato Mountains

2000

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

Yamato 000047

2000

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

Yamato 000097

2000

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

18

Yamato 000593

2000

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

Yamato 000749

2000

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

Yamato 000802

2000

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

19

Yamato 793605

1979

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

20

Yamato 980459

1998

olivine-phyric shergottite

Yamato 980497

1998

olivine-phyric shergottite

21

Yamato 984028

1998

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

22

YA 1075 (Yanai)

~2000

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

23

GRV 99027

Antarctica, Grove Hill

2000

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

24

GRV 020090

2003

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

25

MIL 03346

Antarctica, Transantarctic Mountains, Miller Range

2003

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

MIL 090030

2009

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

MIL 090032

2009

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

MIL 090136

2009

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

26

RBT 04261

Antarctica, Roberts Massiv

2004

olivine-phyric shergottite

RBT 04262

2004

olivine-phyric shergottite

27

LAR 06319

Antarctica, Larkman Nunatak

2006

olivine-phyric shergottite

   

 North Africa

 

 

28

Dar al Gani 476

Libya

1998

olivine- orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

Dar al Gani 489

1997

olivine- orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

Dar al Gani 670

1999

olivine- orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

Dar al Gani 735

1997

olivine- orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

Dar al Gani 876

1998

olivine- orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

Dar al Gani 975

1999

olivine- orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

Dar al Gani 1037

1999

olivine- orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

Dar al Gani xxxx

1999

olivine- orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

Dar al Gani 1051

2000

olivine- orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

29

Ksar Ghilane 002

Tunisia

2010

basaltic shergottite

30

NWA 817

Marocco

2000

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

31

NWA 1950

Marocco

2001

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

32

NWA 2646

NW-Africa

2004

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

33

NWA 4468

El Aiun, Western Sahara

2006

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

34

NWA 4797

Marocco, Missour

2001

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

35

NWA 1195

Marocco, Safsaf

2002

olivine-orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

36

NWA 1068

Marocco, Maarir

2001

olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 1110

2001

olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 1183

2002

olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 1775

2002

olivine-phyric shergottite

37

NWA 2373

Marocco, Erfoud

2004

olivine-phyric shergottite

38

NWA 2969

Marocco

2005

olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 3186

2005

 olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 4222

2006

 olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 5789

2009

 olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 6162

2010

 olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 6963

2011

olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 7032

2011

olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 7042

2011

olivine-phyric shergottite

39

Tissint

Marocco, Qued Draa

2011

olivine-phyric shergottite

40

NWA 480

Marocco

2000

basaltic shergottite

NWA 856

2002

basaltic shergottite

NWA 1460

2001

basaltic shergottite

NWA 1669

2001

basaltic shergottite

NWA 2800

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 4480

2006

basaltic shergottite

41

NWA 5029

Mauritania, Bir Gandous

2003

basaltic shergottite

NWA 5298

2008

basaltic shergottite

42

NWA 5990

Marocco

2009

basaltic shergottite

43

NWA 7397

Western Sahara, Smara

2012

basaltic shergottite

44

NWA 2737

Marocco

2000

dunite (chassignite)

45

NWA 998

Algeria

2001

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

46

NWA 2046

Algeria

2003

olivine-orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

NWA 2626

2004

olivine-orthopyroxene-phyric shergottite

47

NWA 4527

Algeria

2006

olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 4925

2007

olivine-phyric shergottite

48

NWA 2975

Algeria

2005

basaltic shergottite

NWA 2986

2006

basaltic shergottite

NWA 2987

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 3171

2004

basaltic shergottite

NWA 4766

2006

basaltic shergottite

NWA 4783

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 4857

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 4864

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 4878

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 4880

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 4930

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 5140

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 5214

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 5219

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 5313

2008

basaltic shergottite

NWA 5366

2007

basaltic shergottite

NWA 5718

2006

basaltic shergottite

NWA xxxx

2009

basaltic shergottite

49

NWA 6342

Algeria

2010

peridotite (lherzolitic shergottite)

50

NWA 5790

Mauritania

2008

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

NWA 6148

2009

clinopyroxenite (nakhlite)

51

NWA 2990

NW-Africa

2007

 olivine-phyric shergottite

52

NWA 5960

Mauritania

2009

 olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 6234

2010

 olivine-phyric shergottite

NWA 6710

2011

 olivine-phyric shergottite

53

NWA 7500

Mali, Taoudenni

2012

Shergottite

 

 

NWA 7034

Marocco

2011

Porphyritic basaltic monomict breccia *

NWA 7533

2012

Achrondrite breccia **

 

*   Porphyritic basaltic monomict breccia, with a few euhedral phenocrysts up to several millimeters and many phenocryst fragments of dominant andesine, low-Ca pyroxene, pigeonite, and augite set in a very fine-grained, clastic to plumose, groundmass with abundant magnetite and maghemite; accessory sanidine, anorthoclase, Cl-rich apatite, ilmenite, rutile, chromite, pyrite, and goethite.
Plagioclase and pyroxene compositions similar to basaltic shergottites, however the oxygen isotopic values are higher than the SNC fractionation array.
Plagioclase feldspar is the most abundant phase (38.0±1.2%), followed by low-Ca pyroxene (25.4±8.1%), clinopyroxenes (18.2±4.0%), iron-oxides (9.7±1.3%), alkali feldspars (4.9±1.3%), and apatite (3.7±2.6%). Hydrogen isotopes: six whole-rock combustion measurements yielded a bulk water content of 6190±620 ppm.

**  Petrography: (R. Hewins, MNHNP) Breccia, largest objects (~1 cm) are flattened, oval or curved fine-grained melt bodies containing crystal fragments, often with melt mantles or coatings. The melt rocks have a fine-grained subophitic to fasciculate texture (grain size 2-5 μm) and are characterized by clots with central oxides (magnetite, chromite or ilmenite) in a mass of pyroxene dendrites embedded in aureoles of plagioclase. Clasts (to ~2 mm) are dominantly crystal clasts of pyroxenes and feldspars, with magnetite and chlorapatite, small coarse-grained noritic-monzonitic fragments (>1 mm grains) made up of several of these phases, microbasalts with subophitic to granoblastic textures (grain size 1-5 μm) and melt spheres (~100 μm to >3 mm). Pyroxenes include orthopyroxene, inverted pigeonite, pigeonite (in microbasalts), and augite. Feldspars include plagioclase, anorthoclase, orthoclase and perthite. Inverted pigeonite contains 10 μm exsolution lamellae. Olivine occurs as dendrites in one melt sphere. The fine-grained interclast matrix is difficult to discern because clasts have sizes down to ~5 μm; it consists of anhedral μm-sized plagioclase with sub-μm pyroxene surrounding and embedded in it plus magnetite, often symplectitic or lacy. Rare pyrite is replaced by magnetite and hydrated or oxidized magnetite.
Classification: Achondrite ungrouped. Breccia, probably paired with NWA 7034. The oxygen isotopic values are identical to those of that ungrouped achondrite breccia, and the range of mineral compositions of the two meteorites are very similar.

 

The most abundant group of SNC meteorites are called the basaltic shergottites. Their composition is similar to that of rocks analysed at the Opportunity landing site and the basaltic component that forms much of the martian surface regolith and underlying geology in terms of Fe enrichment. However, the Spirit rocks are picritic and also more alkali-rich than the basaltic shergottites. Olivine-phyric shergottites form another recognizable group of the shergottites, which accumulated phenocryst or xenocryst olivine grains from a separate olivine-saturated basaltic melt. These large olivine grains were not derived by disruption of peridotite shergottite sources because the olivine-phyric shergottites generally have a more highly depleted geochemistry than the peridotitic shergottites. Peridotite shergottites have the clearest cumulate textures of the SNCs and differ from the other shergottites in their low proportion of feldspathic material and high proportions of olivine. The cores of pyroxene in basaltic shergottites crystallized slowly at depth from melts that at least in some cases were H2O-bearing followed by more rapid crystallization of the Fe-rich rims in a near-surface intrusive or extrusive setting.
Pyroxenite nakhlites formed as cumulates in a thick lava flow from the accumulation of augite followed by olivine. Trapping of varying amounts (5-20%) of basaltic, interstitial melt (the nakhlites in the upper parts of the parental lava flow having the higher proportions of trapped melt) has given the nakhlites their LREE-enriched geochemical signature. The dunite Chassigny, which has near-identical ejection and crystallization ages to the nakhlites, may also be associated with them.
The martian mantle source region has over twice the FeO contents of the terrestrial mantle and the SNC compositions reflect this in their Fe enrichment compared with analogous terrestrial and lunar rocks. Another compositional feature of the SNCs is their low Al contents, which reflect depletion of source regions, perhaps as a result of the formation of a magma ocean. However, discordance between Mg-number and Al2O3 contents of the nakhlite and other SNC groups shows that the SNC melts were derived from mantle source regions with differing depletion histories. The modelled martian magma ocean would have a lower proportion of plagioclase and lower density than the lunar one. Inferred noble metal contents in the martian mantle calculated from the SNCs suggest that, like the Earth, Mars underwent a later accretion of chondritic material.
In addition to petrographic classification, we suggest that the basaltic, olivine-phyric and peridotitic shergottites can also be subclassified geochemically on the basis of their LREE depletion into HD (highly depleted), MD (moderately depleted) and SD (slightly depleted). The SD shergottites mainly correspond to the basaltic shergottites, the MD to peridotitic shergottites and the HD correspond to olivine-phyric shergottites.
The melt compositions of the SNCs, either known directly from the whole-rock composition or calculated from melt inclusions within cumulate phases, do not show any clear evidence for an andesitic component. The best data available from the Pathfinder rock analyses suggest that those rocks may be basaltic andesites; that is, with slightly higher SiO 2 and Na2O + K 2O than the basaltic shergottites (although it is possible that this chemistry reflects contamination of the Pathfinder analyses by alteration rinds). Spectroscopic data in support of the geochemical evidence for an andesitic component in the northern lowlands of Mars are not yet conclusive. However, the existence of a K- and Fe-enriched component in parts of the northern lowlands distinct from the basaltic signature in the remaining northern lowlands and southern highlands is established. The formation mechanism for such large-scale magmatic heterogeneities is not clear but might involve fractionation of basaltic magmas trapped in magma ocean rocks or the fractionation of shergottitic compositions under hydrous conditions.
The absence of an andesitic-like chemical signature in the SNCs suggests that they were derived from areas in the northern lowlands where the K-rich 'andesitic' spectral signature is absent or in low abundance. Two likely regions are the Tharsis region of shield volcanoes and the Elysium-Amazonis volcanic plains. These regions also contain young volcanic rocks compatible with the relatively young ages of the SNCs. The crystallization ages fall within five groups. ALH84001 is the oldest at 4.5 Ga, the nakhlites and Chassigny have ages of 1.3 Ga, peridotitic shergottites 180 Ma and basaltic shergottites 165-475 Ma. On the basis of these ages it is clear that only the ALH84001 orthopyroxenite is derived from the ancient highlands. The SNCs were ejected from Mars in between four and seven impact events but uncertainties in the calculation of ejection ages means that the grouping of samples with ejection events is not always clear. However, the ejection of the nakhlites and Chassigny in one event at 11 Ma is well established.

This summary is results from a meeting held at the Geological Society of London in 2003 about Volcanism on Mars.

An interesting question is this:
Have the recently diagnosed organic cellules and carbonat globules in the basaltic SNC - meteorites ALH 84001 a relevance ?

 

Organic Compounds in Martian Meteorites
May Be Terrestrial Contaminants

Written by A. J. T. Jull
NSF Arizona Accelerator Mass Spectrometer Facility,
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
posted February 17, 1998

"The organic material in ALH84001 can be identified by its combustion behavior, and contains several discrete components. We do not assert we have completely separated all these components. We identified low-temperature (<400oC) combustible material (probably organic phases) which appears to be the result of two or more contamination events at about 13,000 years ago, which introduced carbon with 13C about -25‰; a recent event of 13C about -34‰; and presumably other intermediate events are possible. We can also identify a more resistant phase, ~47ppm C, which combusts between 400-500oC and is characterized by 13C of -14.7‰ and low 14C. This phase must be indigenous to the meteorite and hence presumably, Mars. This mysterious phase represents a little less than ~20% of the carbon-bearing material in this meteorite, but it is not certain it is an organic compound. Hence, we say that at least 80% of the organic material of ALH84001 is of terrestrial origin.
What are the implications for the data reported by David McKAY and his colleagues? They studied only organic compounds in the form of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in ALH 84001. This material represents less than 1% of organic material in this meteorite. The small size of this fraction precludes 14C measurements, even by our sensitive techniques. Our results suggest that most of the organic material in ALH84001 is terrestrial contamination. We cannot rule out some indigenous organic material being present, but our data point out the importance of fully understanding how much contamination has occurred in all the martian meteorites."


Hinweise auf Lebensspuren im Mars-Meteoriten ALH84001 nahezu widerlegt

von Wolfgang B. Lindemann
Studium Integrale Journal
6. Jahrgang / Heft 1 - März 1999

"
NASA-Chef Goldin versetzte am 6. August 1996 die Welt mit der Nachricht in Aufregung, dass ein Wissenschaftler-Team starke Hinweise auf mikrobielle Lebensformen in einem ursprünglich vom Mars stammenden, im Eis der Antarktis entdeckten Meteoriten gefunden habe (McKAY et al. 1996). ALH84001, der besagte Meteorit, wurde nach einem angenommenen 12000-jährigen Aufenthalt im Eis der Antarktis 1984 bei einer Forschungsexpedition gefunden. Die Herkunft vom Mars wurde 1993 durch Analysen von Gaseinschlüssen abgeleitet. Wie bereits im Studium Integrale Journal berichtet (PAILER 1997), legten mehrere verschiedene Untersuchungsergebnisse anfänglich den Schluss nahe, dass es auf dem Mars früher mikrobielles organisches Leben gegeben haben könnte. Im einzelnen fanden sich:

  • Mineralstrukturen, die im Elektronenmikroskop fossilen Bakterien morphologisch ähneln,

  • Spuren organischer Verbindungen, u.a. sogenannte polyzyklische aromatische Kohlenwasserstoffe (PAK),

  • winzige, 50nm große rosettenförmige Karbonatstrukturen, die möglicherweise durch Bakterien gebildet wurden,

  • Magnetitkörnchen, die von irdischen Bakterien gebildeten Magnetitkonglomeraten ähneln.

Pailer (1997) hat bereits eine vorläufige Bewertung dieser Funde vorgelegt. Damals wurde u.a. darauf hingewiesen, dass die Anwesenheit von organischem Material an sich nicht auf einen biogenen Ursprung schließen lasse; insbesondere PAKs wären auch in anderen Arten von Meteoriten gefunden worden. Weiterhin wurde ausgeführt, dass das kleinste terrestrische Mikrofossil 100 mal größer sei als die Mineralstrukturen im Meteoriten ALH84001 und dass nicht klar sei, bei welcher Temperatur die gefundenen Karbonate gebildet wurden: hohe Temperaturen zur Zeit ihrer Bildung würden Leben ausschließen. Schließlich ähnele die Struktur der Magnetitkörnchen irdischen anorganisch gebildeten Magnetiten und sei damit anders als die von irdischen Bakterien gebildete.
Zwei Jahre intensiver Forschung haben nun eine erdrückende Menge an Argumenten erbracht, die gegen die Deutung der Funde in ALH84001 als Spuren mikrobiellen Lebens sprechen.
Auf einem internationalen Workshop vom 2.- 4. November 1998 in Houston, Texas, wurden die Ergebnisse verschiedener Arbeitsgruppen zusammengetragen und diskutiert (KERR 1998). Dabei ergab sich:

1. Die als "fossile Bakterien" angesehenen Mineralstrukturen sind um Größenordnungen zu klein, um als mikrobielles Leben angesehen werden zu können. Eine E. coli Zelle besitzt einen Durchmesser von etwa 2000 nm. Auf einem internationalen Kongress wurde erst kürzlich Konsens darüber erzielt, dass aus theoretischen Gründen eine Zelle mit einem geringeren Durchmesser als 200 nm nach der uns bekannten Biochemie nicht lebensfähig ist, da sie zu wenig Platz besitzt, um eine Minimalausstattung an DNA und Zellorganellen zu beherbergen (Vogel). Die Größe der meisten Mineralstrukturen liegt im Bereich einiger 10 Nanometer, ein gefundener 250nm langer "Wurm" ist zu klein, um das für Leben notwendige Volumen bereitstellen zu können. Die Annahme, dass extraterrestrisches Leben nach einer uns unbekannten Chemie funktioniert, ist zwar theoretisch denkbar, zum gegenwärtigen Zeitpunkt aber nicht prüfbar und damit wissenschaftlich bedeutungslos. Wie John BRADlEY und Allan TREIMANN auf dem Workshop in Houston ausführten, sind von der Erde anorganische Prozesse bekannt, die vergleichbare Strukturen abiogenetisch bilden können.

2. Da der Meteorit 12000 Jahre im Eis der Antarktis gelegen haben soll, wäre eine Kontamination mit von außen eingedrungenen PAKs denkbar. Eine Studie im Januar 1998 schien diese Annahme zunächst sehr wahrscheinlich zu machen, da das kurzlebige Kohlenstoffisotop 14C in den organischen Verbindungen im Meteoriten gefunden wurde. In Anbetracht des Alters des Meteoriten dürfte kein 14C vorhanden sein - die 14C-haltigen Verbindungen müssen also auf der Erde hineingelangt sein. Im Juli 1998 wurde dieser Befund insofern relativiert, als andere antarktische Meteoriten, die sich viel länger im Eis befanden, zwar 14C enthielten, aber nicht denselben Typ von PAKs. Demnach wäre jetzt zu postulieren, dass möglicherweise die PAKs vom Mars her vorhanden waren, während andere organische Verbindungen auf der Erde hinein diffundierten. In keinem Fall ist allerdings das Vorhandensein von polyzyklischen aromatischen Kohlenwasserstoffen ein Beweis für das Vorhandensein von Leben, denn solche Verbindungen können auch abiotisch entstehen.

3. Die 50nm großen Karbonatrosetten können gleichfalls nicht als Beweis für Leben gelten, denn sie entstehen auf der Erde auch unter abiotischen Bedingungen. Als Temperaturbereich für ihre Bildung nimmt man gegenwärtig zwischen 0°C und 300°C an. Da auf der Erde die Temperaturgrenze für Leben aber bei 113°C liegt, würden, unter Annahme grundsätzlich ähnlicher Eigenschaften extraterrestrischen Lebens, hohe Temperaturen zum Zeitpunkt der Entstehung dieser Karbonate deren biotische Entstehung ausschließen, niedrige Temperaturen würden lediglich eine biotische Entstehung möglich erscheinen lassen, sie aber nicht beweisen.

4. Der einzige eventuell zugunsten von Lebensspuren in ALH84001 deutbare Befund sind die Magnetitknöllchen. Bakterien benutzen sie als magnetische Kompasse bzw. als Deponien für überflüssiges Eisen. Nach Untersuchungen können 75% von ihnen aufgrund ihrer Struktur anorganisch produziert worden sein, während für 25% keine anorganisch entstandenen Homologa auf der Erde bekannt sind. Dieses Argument wird erheblich geschwächt durch den noch unzureichenden Kenntnisstand, der es nach Aussagen von Magnetitforschern nicht erlaubt, sicher zu sagen, welche Strukturen biotisch und welche abiotisch entstehen.

Die weitaus meisten Teilnehmer am Workshop in Houston waren der Meinung, dass die Funde in ALH84001 keine Hinweise für Leben bieten. Eine Minderheit, unter ihnen der Entdecker der vermeintlichen Lebensspuren, McKAY, beharrte auf der Deutung als Leben und verlangte vehement weitere Forschungen. Hauptproblem dürfte in der Zukunft sein, dass die "Leben"-Hypothese nur schwer absolut zu widerlegen ist, da extraterrestrisches Leben auch auf einer völlig anderen als der uns bekannten Biochemie basieren könnte. Nach der uns bekannten Biochemie kann freilich jetzt schon das Vorhandensein von Lebensspuren in ALH84001 mit großer Sicherheit ausgeschlossen werden."